14.01.2021

Reynolds Sdv66 Review

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Triathlon Talk » 23mm vs 25mmRss Feed

Hello, Ryan from Reynolds here. There is a little confusion due to the subject title. We make a DV46 rim and an SDV66 rim, and the ERD's may be confused due to the subject title of this post. Per our tech manager who measured all the rims himself: MV32- 578 DV46- 554 SDV66- 510. Roadbikereview Newsletter. Get the latest road bike reviews, news, race results, and much more by signing up for the Roadbikereview Newsletter. The SDV66 T wheels take Reynolds into a deeper territory than ever before with a 66mm-deep carbon tubular rim that Agritubel’s yellow jersey-clad Roman Feillu used to cut through the summer heat of. Road comfort: 3 Those who ride deep-dish aero wheels exclusively will find Reynolds SDV66 C wheels to be relatively comfortable. That said, they deliver a noticeable pounding to the arms and back when compared to a lighterweight climbing or road racing wheelset. The SDV66 T's I rode last year felt more lively(the strikes I believe are built with standard spokes, which may effect that), but if you have a hard time with crosswinds it's a difficult set to handle.


I just got a great deal on a set of Reynolds SDV66 wheels from a guy and he put a new set of Continental GP4000s on them for me. They are 25mm tires. These are going to be my race wheels, so my question is the 25mm going to be slower than if they had 23mm tires on them. I've tried to see online what were people's thoughts (ST), but it seems everyone has 'their own' opinion about it. Just wanted to see what anyone else thinks.

2012-01-30 6:52 PM

In theory a 23mm tire will be narrower (less wind resistance) and lighter (less material used in construction.) In real life I have no idea if it's going to be enough to notice.

I think the bigger question is how much rolling resistance does said tire have? Does it have a tread pattern or is it slick?

edit: oops I see you mentioned it's a GP4000. I'm not a tire expert but looks pretty slick to me.


Edited by wbattaile 2012-01-30 6:54 PM
2012-01-30 6:57 PM

There is a great resource that lists various tires and how they perform with different type of tubes.

My computer crashed and I don't have link handy. I'm sure someone else will post the link.

This explains some of the whys of rolling resistance and tire selection and has a limited chart but not the one I'm looking for.

2012-01-30 6:58 PM

Those are nice tires. I prefer to ride 21mm or 23mm for racing. They feel faster and handle better for me.
2012-01-30 7:26 PM

The deal is the new 24-25mm wheels are more areo because they are the same width as the tire and form a smoother flow. The wider profile is supposed to give a better ride. HED and Velocity both make a wider 'aero' rim. You could try to look those up and see what you find. I have been looking to get some as a everyday/race wheel set myself.
2012-01-30 8:00 PM

25's will have better rolling resistance (claims Continental) and better ride quality. No, they will not be as aero. The ride quality alone would be worth it to me (if I didn't run 23mm wide HED/Velocity wheels with 23's (which gets the same result in the end)).

2012-01-30 8:04 PM

powerman - 2012-01-30 6:26 PM The deal is the new 24-25mm wheels are more areo because they are the same width as the tire and form a smoother flow. The wider profile is supposed to give a better ride. HED and Velocity both make a wider 'aero' rim. You could try to look those up and see what you find. I have been looking to get some as a everyday/race wheel set myself.

I'm so sorry for the above.. I read wheels instead of tires. Probably because I have been looking at wide rims.. carry on. Don't mind me.

2012-01-30 8:07 PM

Thinner the wheel = less rubber on road (as long as tire is properly inflated)

Less rubber on road = less friction.

Of course the construction of the tire can make a difference but before I got my carbon tubulars I raced on a set of NOS 19mm tires I dug up at a dusty LBS here in town. Swear they made me go 1 mph faster than my 23 mm Contis. YMMV.

2012-01-30 10:12 PM

As a heavier rider, I prefer a 25mm on the back. It seems to ride better and I'm convinced it saves me some flats too. A smaller tire might roll easier on good pavement but I see enough rougher surfaces and debris to make the trade-off worth it.
2012-01-31 2:57 PM

This was debated at length on ST, and there was rather convincing evidence that the 25 had lower rolling resistance and was therefore a superior choice. Not saying I understood all the physics, but it sounded good.

A search on SlowTwitch should find it. Iit was actually a good read.

2012-01-31 3:08 PM

Oysterboy - 2012-01-30 8:07 PM

Thinner the wheel = less rubber on road (as long as tire is properly inflated)

Less rubber on road = less friction.

Canon laser shot lbp-1120 driver windows 7 32 bit. Of course the construction of the tire can make a difference but before I got my carbon tubulars I raced on a set of NOS 19mm tires I dug up at a dusty LBS here in town. Swear they made me go 1 mph faster than my 23 mm Contis. YMMV.


Most likely you had latex tubes in the tubulars because 19mm roll slower than 23mm of the same tire.

2012-01-31 3:41 PM

If I remember correctly from a similiarly thread there are multiple variables involved. With some of the newer rims being wider the 25mm tire had less bulge from tire to rim and therefore conducted the air smoother around the tIre. Also, the contact patch with the 23mm was more ovalized from front to rear meaning at any given moment you may have more of the tire in contact with the ground than the larger 25mm tire that had a more circular contact patch. The 25mm gave you better control and comfort.Those are just some of the points that came up through various threads and are not my opinions. However, based on what I read I decided to give the 25mm a try and at the same psi I do not see any difference in speed or effort level but do feel a little more comfortable over long rides. I think ultimately it has a lot to do with your weight and rim selection as to how it can affect you but whatever the difference, it is very minimal

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Driver
2012-01-31 4:58 PM

One thing you might want to do is put them on your bike and ride them before you get into it any further. If I put 25mm tires on my bike the front brake digs into the tire itself and the wheel doesn't move.
The rest I leave up to those who are better versed in minutia.
2012-01-31 5:56 PM

Oysterboy - 2012-01-30 8:07 PM

Thinner the wheel = less rubber on road (as long as tire is properly inflated)

Less rubber on road = less friction.

Of course the construction of the tire can make a difference but before I got my carbon tubulars I raced on a set of NOS 19mm tires I dug up at a dusty LBS here in town. Swear they made me go 1 mph faster than my 23 mm Contis. YMMV.

There is a lot more involved in rolling resistance than this. Your weight and the durometer of the tire material are huge factors in the rolling resistance just to name two.

I did read an article on it a couple years ago and they stated that any rider over XXXlbs should be on at least 25mm tires. I forget what that weight was but I think it was 180lbs?

Reynolds Sdv66 Reviews

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